Newick Village Society

NVS Logo Home News About Us Planning Events Membership Contact Us

News

About Us

Planning

Quotable Quotes

Events

Membership

Contact Us

 

Quotable Quotes

  1. In 1981/1982 the Lewes District Council refused planning permission (LW/81/0627) for a private housing estate at Oxbottom Lane on the edge of Newick. In the District Council’s own appeal statement, backing up their refusal, they stated "to all intents and purposes Newick has almost reached the limit of its natural growth." That was 36 years ago !!!
  2. The Society has consistently followed the theme that new housing in Newick should be for ‘Newick’s Needs’. The inspectors February 1999 report on the objections to the Lewes District Local Plan stated on pages 231-234, "I support the Plan's approach of avoiding residential allocations in Newick unless justified by specific local needs." He stated that he saw no justification for allocating the site next to the telephone exchange for housing, and furthermore that such an extension of the planning boundary "could lead to pressure for more development." The Society particularly remembers the very significant meeting held in the village hall on 17th October 2011. A total of 152 of the Newick residents who attended voted on how many new houses would be appropriate to build over the following 20 years. The vote was overwhelmingly for under 30 houses to fulfil ‘Newick’s Needs’.
  3. The District Council’s ‘Summary of Consultations on the Emerging Core Strategy’, in March 2012, stated, in regard to the comments on Newick from the 78 respondents "Most of these representations supported the approach put forward by the Newick Village Society, which is opposed to a large expansion of the village but supports some new housing development (perhaps 30 houses) to meet the local needs of Newick residents. Newick Parish Council itself considers that the village needs a limited number of low cost and affordable houses."
  4. In 2012 the Lewes District Council’s Sustainability Appraisal for the Joint Core Strategy, when referring to Newick, considered option A (planned growth of approx 100 homes) or option B (approx 154 homes). Option A for 100 was clearly pursued, with the Neighbourhood Plan subsequently showing that number. Option B, for as many as 154 homes, was not pursued because, as stated in paragraph 10.33 of that Appraisal, it was "seen as having more considerable negative consequences to the community, travel and land efficiency objectives." Furthermore, the Appraisal tables added that, if the village had 154 new homes it "may alter the character of the village, which may have a negative effect on community happiness." These are the District Council’s own words. Do you think they are still applicable?
  5. The Parish Council, when considering the preparation of a Neighbourhood Plan for the village, was under great pressure from the Lewes District Council to accept as many as 100 new homes. Both the Village Society and the Parish Council were not happy with such a high number. However, the Parish Council newsletter for autumn 2013 explained the position: "We have been strongly advised that unless we produce a Plan that caters for a further 100 houses until 2030 the Plan will be rejected and the inspector of the Core Strategy is very likely to then insist that an even greater number of homes be built in Newick. After a long debate, the Council has reluctantly decided to prepare the Plan for this number."
  6. There exists a national ‘Index of Multiple Deprivation’ which is calculated, for areas throughout the country, on a range of factors covering income, employment, health, education, housing, crime and living environment. A Lewes District Council document in November 2017 states  "Newick being in the top three percent of least deprived areas nationwide." A thought-provoking statement!

Home News About Us Planning Events Membership Contact Us